Everything You Need to Know About AFib and Sex


Enjoy Sex Without Complications

Everything You Need to Know About AFib and SexSex is a fairly common concern among AFib patients, since it’s seemingly pretty strenuous for the heart. There’s no doubt that, among all its pleasurable virtues, sex kicks up the heart rate and flushes your body with energy, but is that good or bad for your cardiovascular health?

Living with a heart condition means paying closer attention to everyday triggers and potential dangers, but it’s important to separate facts from myths before you include or exclude something from your life. Find out why, and how, you should balance good AFib management with a healthy sex life.

Psychological Obstacles to Intimacy

AFib can be scary, and it’s natural to worry about any activity that could bring about an episode. Before you know it, this worry can overcome your natural and healthy sexual desires, and those of your partner. However, doctors insist that any fear of devastating consequences is misplaced, and will only serve to block your emotional outlets and interfere with your relationship.

It’s true that sex stresses your heart, but that can be very good for the body. Although it will cause your blood pressure to rise and your heart rate to speed up, sex is exercise, and exercise ultimately strengthens the heart muscle. Help put your mind at ease by focusing on the positives that exercise (and sex) will bring:

  • Positive outlook and better mood
  • Healthy weight
  • Better sleep
  • Stronger self confidence

In fact, experts warn that a lack of sexual activity can feed anxiety and depression, which is particularly worrying if changes or limitations posed by your AFib have already affected your emotional health. Also, if anxiety begins to interfere with your daily routine, you may be less inclined to stay on track with your physical fitness, and the cycle continues.

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If you can’t seem to convince yourself that everything will be alright, talk to your doctor. Many patients find that simply hearing a medical professional confirm that they can have sex without it interfering with their AFib is enough to calm and reassure their minds. If you’re worried about your partner’s AFib, the same applies – talk to a doctor about the statistics and possibilities of problems to get a clearer picture.

Next page: physical precautions to take for safety and comfort. 

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Angela FinlayAngela Finlay

Angela is a freelance writer and blogger committed to learning, understanding and communicating about the matters that affect daily life. From fitness and lifestyle, pregnancy and medical ailments, she has covered a range of health topics throughout her web writing career, contributing to major websites for over three years.

Feb 26, 2015
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